Interview with Dirigo Advisors Founder Patrick McGinnis

Full Name & Georgetown School and Year

Patrick J. McGinnis, SFS ‘98

Professional Title & Organization

Author, The 10% Entrepreneur and Founder, Dirigo Advisors

Career

What has been the most rewarding moment of your career?

Combining all of the experiences and lessons learned from investing in fast growing companies on five continents into a book that encourages everyone to be an entrepreneur without quitting their day job. My goal was to reach a global audience and that’s been truly rewarding. The book has been translated into a bunch of languages and I’ve spoken on the topic of 10% Entrepreneurship in a diverse set of places, such as Argentina, Uganda, Saudi Arabia, Jordan, and Mongolia.

What do you wish you had done earlier in your career?

I wish I had been more open to working on side projects as a way to explore interests, learn, and generate opportunities for upside. I was heads down and all-in on finance, which didn’t work out so well during the 2008 financial crisis.

What trends do you see in your profession or industry?

Entrepreneurship is going global due to the falling cost of innovating and the now indisputable fact that talent is borderless. As a result, you don’t need to be in Silicon Valley or New York or London to succeed. You can be almost anywhere.

What is the hardest thing you have ever done professionally? 

I’m credited with coining the term FOMO while I was a student at Harvard Business School. Staying focused, even when it’s not fun or profitable to do so, never gets easier.

What is the best career advice you have ever received? 

Find something you want to be known for it, write about it, establish your authority on the topic.

Hilltop Memories

How has Georgetown shaped you?

I like to joke that I have the most SFS career I could have imagined. Without question, the intellectual foundation and language skills that I got at Georgetown are fundamental to everything I do. I all have been heavily influenced by the values of cura personalis and social justice that I discovered on the hilltop.

What was your favorite professor or class at Georgetown?

“International Political Economy” with Prof. George Shambaugh and “Problem of God” with Julia Lamm

What is your favorite Georgetown memory?

Winning a ticket to see Bill Clinton speak at Gaston Hall my freshman year. I loved that Georgetown gave tickets out so democratically. It is still the greatest speech I have ever seen in person.

Your Inspirations

Who is a source of inspiration and strength to you in your life and why?

If you pay attention, you can find inspiration all around you, even in the little things. I try to pay attention and stay grateful for the little things.

What is on your desk right now?

A Oaxacan black clay skull from a great store called Tienda MAP in Mexico City. It’s a good reminder to make the most of each day.

Who is your favorite author? 

F. Scott Fitzgerald

What is one part of your daily routine you couldn’t live without?

I hate monotony, so I rebel against routine, but no matter where I am or what I’m doing, I will always start my day with a cup of very good coffee.

Final Word

What are your words to live by?

Always make sure to have more than one string to your bow.

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What We’re Reading This Week

Daniel Pink

Greetings from the Hilltop, blog readers!  Whitney Pezza, Associate Director, Alumni Career Services, here to guest blog today, and share with you one of my new favorite books, “To Sell Is Human” by Daniel Pink.

I’m a longtime Daniel Pink fan, and I love his work.  In fact, one of my proudest career moments was when Mr. Pink replied to one of my Hoya Gateway tweets. (Seriously, see the picture below). I recommend this particular book to anyone and everyone.  Here’s the short summary:

Who should read it? Anyone who is interested in being a more effective persuader. Anyone who is interested in better understanding the people with whom they work and interact.

Why? According to Pink, everyone is in sales now, and in order to be an effective seller, it’s crucial to understand how to best persuade others to take action.  The days of the sleazy car salesperson should be long behind us – sales is about much more thank most people think, and everyone is doing it.  Pink commissioned a study that shows that  people, from lawyers to teachers, spend 40% of their work time selling something.

Quotable: In an interview about his book, Daniel Pink discusses why the book and the traits he outlines within are pertinent to everyone, regardless of their industry, “Whether we’re selling an idea, a product, or ourselves, we need a high degree of openness, honesty, and transparency. It’s a very different world and a lot of the research shows that doing well in this world depends on having fundamentally human qualities — understanding people’s perspectives or leaving people better off.”

I hope you find the time to enjoy and learn from this book!  Be sure the check out the discussion guide, too.

Daniel Pink 2